Sweetwater Presents a SXSW Hangout in Austin, Texas with Lee Bains III & The Glory Fires, Erika Wennerstrom, Tino Drima, Marty O'Reilly & The Old Soul Orchestra, Skyway Man, John Craigie,  & Rainy Eyes

Sweetwater Presents a SXSW Hangout in Austin, Texas with Lee Bains III & The Glory Fires, Erika Wennerstrom, Tino Drima, Marty O'Reilly & The Old Soul Orchestra, Skyway Man, John Craigie, & Rainy Eyes

Wednesday, March 14, 2018

11:00 am (event ends at 7:00 pm)

This event is 21 and over


Sweetwater Presents a SXSW Hangout in Austin, Texas
Sweetwater Presents a SXSW Hangout in Austin, Texas
Sweetwater is heading to Austin, Texas! We will be hosting an unofficial SXSW Rooftop Hangout on Weds March 14 at Handlebar Austin.

Featuring some of our favorite Bay Area bands, and some of our favorite non-Bay Area bands, we'll be bringing a taste of Sweetwater MV to ATX. There will be great beers from North Coast Brewing all day long, great tunes all day long, and hopefully sunny ATX skies. If you're in Austin, come hangout!

***This event is NOT at Sweetwater in MV! This is in Austin, Texas, at Handlebar Austin. 121 E 5th ST. Austin, Texas***
Lee Bains III & The Glory Fires
Lee Bains III & The Glory Fires
On June 30th, 2017, Don Giovanni Records released Youth Detention///(Nail My Feet Down to the South Side of Town), the third full-length album by Lee Bains III & the Glory Fires.

Call it Youth Detention for short. A double LP spanning 17 songs, it is the band’s most ambitious work to date — a sprawling and visceral record given to both deep introspection and high-volume spiritual uplift.

Where The Glory Fires’ previous LP Dereconstructed (2014) sought to dismantle one-dimensional notions of Southern identity and culture, Youth Detention has a similar, but more personal intent. “It’s about dismantling myself and the narratives that I’ve taken on,” explains Bains. “It’s an examination of youth and the processes through which we begin to consider ourselves, our identities, and what various communities we belong to or are in tension with.” Often, the songs detail moments in which cultural boundaries and biases become apparent — scenes in which systems of privilege and oppression become visible, particularly as they relate to race, class, and gender. Everyday settings — a church, a ballpark, a cafeteria — are revisited again and again, to explore these fleeting moments of revelation from different perspectives and roles. It’s a record defined by accumulation. Stories, images, and thoughts pile up to create confusion and cacophony in the narrative.

Recorded in Nashville, Tennessee at Battletapes with engineer Jeremy Ferguson and producer Tim Kerr, Youth Detention captures the band in raw form. Each song was cut live to tape, with the four performing in the same room without headphones or baffling. The result is thoroughly human, with Lynn Bridges’ mix retaining the band’s live energy and looseness at the expense of a few out of tune strings. The Glory Fires’ music draws deeply from punk, but also soul, power pop, country, and gospel. It’s equal parts careful curation and geographic inheritance. “It’s the sound of my place,” says Bains. “I want to know it. I want to argue with it. I don’t want to be a band from anywhere that could be doing anything. For me, that’s what punk is about — figuring out who I am and how to be the best version of myself. I can’t do that by pretending to be something I’m not.”

The songs are deeply rooted in Bains’ experience of his hometown, Birmingham, AL. Youth Detention depicts a Southern city in the decades surrounding the turn-of-the-millennium: in the throes of white flight, urban disinvestment, racial tension, class struggle, gentrification, gender policing, homophobia, xenophobia, religious fervor, deindustrialization, and economic upheaval.

The lyrics could ring true anywhere, though. The South exists in the world and, like the South, the world is increasingly beholden to many of these same tensions and forces. The songs on Youth Detention are meant as small acts of resistance to those systems. Documenting minor moments — the refusal to sit quietly through a display of bigotry, the act of quieting down and listening to somebody’s struggle, sticking up for friends targeted for their difference — that, hopefully, serve as the beginnings of a more profound awakening.
Erika Wennerstrom
Erika Wennerstrom
Erika Wennerstrom never really considered performing as Erika Wennerstrom, despite being the heart of Heartless Bastards, the only member of the Austin-based indie rock band of which she remains the lone original member.

The Heartless Bastards' story starts in Dayton, Ohio, where Wennerstrom found the name on a multiple choice video trivia game at a bar.

As a songwriting teenager during a time when GBV and Brainiac were packing local bars and three of the Breeders were still in town, Wennerstrom used to sneak into clubs to check out the scene. "I would just see those people—my music heroes—hanging out at the bar like everyone else," she remembers. "I could see myself in them. It gave me inspiration to do my own thing."

After doing the usual business of playing local shows, the trio set out the following year on a regional tour. One of the first gigs of the trip took them to a bar in Akron, where Black Keys' drummer Patrick Carney just happened to be one of only a handful of people in the audience. This chance encounter led Wennerstrom and the Heartless Bastards to Fat Possum Records, with whom they released their debut, Stairs and Elevators, in early 2005.

The band moved on with critical praise in their back pocket, including a four-and-a-half star review from Rolling Stone, which took note that, when Wennerstrom “opens her throat on Stairs and Elevators … she sounds like she’s wailing on the shoulders of giants; her sad and angry vocals channeling all the swagger and spit of a young Robert Plant”

By whatever yardstick you care to measure, it was high time for Erika to get out of Dayton.

In true ascetic discipline, she moved to Austin, Texas in 2007 for a change of inspirational scenery and a new recording project. With the help of producer Mike McCarthy (Spoon, Trail of Dead), she assembled a group of musicians with whom she gave the songs life and uncovered yet another layer of Wennerstrom and the Heartless Bastards. Two of the new Bastards aren’t Texas ringers, but fellow Dayton brethren Dave Colvin on drums, and Jesse Ebaugh on bass, who actually played on the original demo that hooked Fat Possum, throw in one Austin native on guitar, Mark Nathan and you’ve got a new unstoppable force that “Take the stage and literally knock everybody down” – NY Times review of the Bastards SxSW record release performance.

The Decemberists’ guitarist Chris Funk said, "It's been a few years since I've had a voice on repeat in my mind. This voice seems to arrive in my ears while sound checking, often before the shows on a pre-show play list and after shows too -- the songs are just perfect and the band has found their spots behind this incredible woman. A unique and enduring artist arrived into our world once again."

The album, entitled The Mountain, (released February 2009) delivered the powerful howl that fans expect from the Heartless Bastards, but also weaves in adventure with mandolins, banjos, strings and Erika’s transcendent voice.
Tino Drima
Tino Drima
There is both a sense of the odd and the out there and a sense of the intensely familiar that permeates the music made by San Francisco’s Tino Drima, which may be one reason it has registered so deeply with their audience.

One reason for the familiarity may be that Tino Drima consists of the cream of a group of young, adventurous San Francisco musicians who have already been the subject of critical raves—including O (formerly the Black Cobra Vipers), French Cassettes and Spooky Mansion.

Another may be that their music simultaneously—and oddly—recalls music of eras gone by and eras still to come, blending the deep, dark blue romanticism of early rock titans Elvis and Roy Orbison with the oddly driving krautrock rhythms of primal Can, adding a final a dash of artfully arranged horns, strings and manic bellow that makes it all unqualifiably unique.

Something weird is going on in every one of their songs, and that’s a good thing.

Tino Drima is a rising sextet consisting of young San Franciscans Gregory DiMartino, Ryann Gonsalves, Rob Mills, Mackenzie Bunch, Grayson Converse, and Scott Huerta. There is story in who they are, what bands they came from, how their limited edition cassette-onlySmokin’ EP, released last year by the hip East Bay Gaylord’s Party Music label, caused a stir, how the band just won the Deli Magazine’s Composite Chart Poll and were deemed the Deli SF Artist of the year in the Revival Rock/Pop category by both readers and jurors. That sort of thing doesn’t happen much. There are a lot of stories, and there are many more to be heard in the new album they have just finished recording.
Marty O'Reilly & The Old Soul Orchestra
Marty O'Reilly & The Old Soul Orchestra
O'Reilly began his musical journey as a blues guitar player, exploring the works of Blind Willie Johnson, Mississippi John Hurt, John Lee Hooker, Charlie Patton, and Leadbelly. Through extensive listening and studying of the early delta greats, O'Reilly developed a unique foundation onto which he would incorporate themes from influences in other musical veins such as John Fahey, Nick Drake, John Vandiver, and Tom Waits. Whether it be his original pieces, or his renditions of old American classics O'Reilly tells his story through an old and soulful voice, propelled by a sense of authentic emotional adrenaline.

When performing with his trio, The Old Soul Orchestra, O'Reilly is backed by Jeff Kissell on the Double Bass and Chris Lynch on the fiddle. Their versatile musicianship, and soulful chemistry help to expand O'Reilly's songs into pieces that drive like a ten pound hammer, or float like feather and flow seamlessly in-between. The trio was formed in late 2012, and has rapidly made a name for itself along the west coast, being featured at many notable venues and festivals, including Outside Lands Festival (2013), Rivertown Revival Festival (2013), Do It Ourselves Festival (2013), Cafe Du Nord (SF), Hotel Cafe (LA), and Empty Sea Studios (Seattle). The Band released a self titled live album in 2013 and their debut studio album "Pray For Rain" in Spring of 2014.
Skyway Man
Skyway Man
For the last decade, James Wallace & the Naked Light recorded and released music from the fringes of Music City USA, touring all over with a singular vision and purpose. All the while, James Wallace’s name figured in as a trusted companion to a few scenes in particular: the Spacebomb sound coming out of his hometown Richmond, Virginia alongside old friends Natalie Prass and Matthew E. White; inside the new Nashville “underground:” where his bands’ magnetic performance listed them as a favorite among Alabama Shakes' Brittany Howard; producing records, occasionally filling in on keys with cult-treasured Promised Land Sound; and roaming with the Oakland collective of songwriters centered around a converted school bus who travel under the banner “Splendor All Around.” But now the name is Skyway Man. Solo tours in Japan and China, a new batch of songs intertwined with his fascination with UFO religion, signaled a shift in direction. His inner mercury nudged him toward a new role, and the name Skyway Man rose to the surface again and again. Was it the trickster of mythology, the soul of some eternally missing astronaut, or the old singing storyteller trying to get through?

Wallace possesses a knack for getting caught up in outlandish events - discovering a trove of mysterious letters written by a Ufologist to a woman, describing the New Jerusalem and the 4th dimension, or months spent playing Mahjong in a smokey trailer behind Opryland, working as a Mandarin interpreter for Chinese Ice carvers in Nashville. This knack also extends to orchestrating outlandish events, getting interesting people on board in his endeavors–sweet-talking the flow of life into altering its course. Time for a new name and new record. Seen Comin' From a Mighty Eye is a dense undertaking, recorded in different locations, simmering influences, channeling all the correct energies, paying the people and spirits who need to be paid, finishing the work the right way over the slow course of time. He recorded the last Naked Light record in Matthew E. White’s attic, and returned to that revered spot to track this new psych opera about strange futures, haunted pasts, and the Mighty Eye in the sky. Spacebomb house bassist and composer Cameron Ralston provided the horn arrangements and Spacebomb house drummer Pinson Chanselle sat at the kit. Wallace sang, compiled and mixed back in Nashville. It’s the usual stew of B-movie scifi, cosmic American boogie, psychedelic folk and it’s apocalyptically good, focused and potent, an immersive fully realized song cycle and visionary sonic structure.

From his modest rancher in Bordeaux on the Cumberland River, the lights of downtown Nashville are visible at night, shining sweetly or casting a lurid glow depending on atmospheric conditions and the viewer’s mood. Music City is changing fast, but James Wallace is invested in its community and spirit–the true believers, auteur session aces and acid cowboys and cowgirls who need each other to survive the sweltering industrial music machine. Skyway Man transcends this landscape, tapping into an older, more spiritual commerce. Seen Comin' From a Mighty Eye offers the kind of music you would want on the radio for a first or last kiss, the incidental music from some forgotten Spielberg adventure, a soundtrack for the later (not quite latter) days of earth. If lightning strikes and the car radio explodes, it might just be part of the track. Music for driving along the skyway, and thank god the skyway is made of music anyway.
John Craigie
John Craigie
“…the lovechild of John Prine and Mitch Hedberg with a vagabond troubadour edge.” – The Stranger

“The record opens with the shanty-like Dylan-meets-Prine number “Virgin Guitar,” which displays Craigie’s talent for understated singing coupled with poetic lyrics.” – The Portland Tribune

“Craigie’s latest, “I Am California,” is haunting, poetic, and just how a longing for California should sound. Draped in nostalgia and covered in memories, Craigie paints a beautiful homage to the Golden State, with the assistance of singer Gregory Alan Isakov.” – Impose Magazine

“You can be sure I’ll be on the lookout for anything he does from now on.” - No Depression

If John Prine and Mitch Hedberg had a baby, the resulting product would resemble something very close to Portland, OR singer-songwriter John Craigie. Musically comparable to Prine, with the humor and wit of Hedberg, the humble, gracious, and hilarious Craigie is one of the best storytellers of our time. It’s no wonder that Chuck Norris sends him fan mail, and Todd Snider brings him gifts on stage.

The vagabond troubadour has charmed audiences in all 50 states and throughout much of Europe, with a DIY spirit seldom seen these days. While touring solo and with the likes of Jack Johnson, Todd Snider, Shook Twins, Nicki Bluhm, and ALO, Craigie has taken the stage at festivals, sold out venues, intimate house concerts, center camp at Burning Man and even Gregory Alan Isakov’s farm. Although based in Portland, Craigie’s true home is on the road, and just like that he’s on to the next town, playing and singing and telling stories to everyone who wants to listen.

He’ll make you laugh and make you cry, all in the same song. With a fan-base that is more of a continually-expanding circle of friends, John Craigie’s true passion is connecting with people through shared experiences, stories, and song.
Rainy Eyes
Rainy Eyes
Rainy Eyes - Soulful & undisguised, folk, rock, Americana

Rainy Eyes (Irena Eide) is a Norwegian-born Americana singer-songwriter. For the past decade she has been living in the San Francisco Bay Area; writing music, performing and touring throughout the US. Both solo and with a band, her performances have a spell-binding, inspiring effect and a soulful, heartfelt and timeless sound with tight-knit harmonies, melodious solos and thoughtful songwriting.
Rainy Eyes has opened for bands like Jackie Greene, Jon Cleary, Peter Rowan, Steep Ravine and played prominent stages like Sweetwater Music Hall, Henry Miller Library, Ashkenaz, Far West Fest, Sonoma Mountain Music Festival and more.
Rainy Eyes also won "best song of the month" at the Freight and Salvage West Coast Songwriters competition in April 2015 for her song "Moon In The Mirror", and has co-written two songs with grammy-award winning Peter Rowan. These songs will be featured on the upcoming solo debut album.
Her soon to be released debut album produced by Eli West (Cahalen Morrison and Eli West) and also featured on banjo, guitar and harmonies and Amy Scher on fiddle and harmonies and Irena on guitar and lead vocals.

More info, photos and videos at www.rainyeyesmusic.com
Venue Information:
Sweetwater Music Hall
19 Corte Madera Ave.
Mill Valley, CA, 94941