Long Strange Trip Afterparty with Steve Kimock & Friends feat Bobby Vega, Pete Sears, Lebo, John Kimock, Leslie Mendelson & special guests

DocLands Presents

Long Strange Trip Afterparty with Steve Kimock & Friends feat Bobby Vega, Pete Sears, Lebo, John Kimock, Leslie Mendelson & special guests

Sunday, May 14, 2017

Doors: 7:00 pm / Show: 8:00 pm

SOLD OUT! THANK YOU!

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This event is 21 and over

Steve Kimock & Friends
Steve Kimock & Friends
A master of improvisation for over four decades, Steve Kimock has been inspiring music fans with his transcendent guitar speak, voiced through electric, acoustic, lap and pedal steel guitars. While one can say that his genre is rock, no one niche has ever confined him. Instead, through the years, he’s explored various sounds and styles based on what’s moved him at the time, whether it’s blues or jazz; funk or folk; psychedelic or boogie; gypsy or prog-­‐rock; traditional American or world fusion.

Threaded through this expansive and highly nuanced musical landscape is Kimock’s signature sound, the prodigious product of his ability to articulate crystal-­‐clear tone, melody and emotion into intricately woven music crafted with technical brilliance. His passion and devotion to performing live is matchless, and his unparalleled ability to embrace and capture his audiences musically is the stuff of legend.

Kimock co-­‐founded the jazz/rock band Zero in the ‘80s and KVHW in the ‘90s; since then, he has recorded and toured in various outfits under his own name. His collaborations with assorted band mates and groups have provided an everlasting wellspring of inspiration for the guitarist, and he has shared the stage with a seemingly endless array of international musical luminaries. After more than 40 years on stage, Kimock is more committed than ever to a jubilant spirit of musical diversity — the same spirit that has fed his desire to pursue an authentic relationship with the guitar since the day he realized his calling.

Born in Bethlehem, Pennsylvania, in 1955, as a preteen Kimock spent plenty of time at the home of his aunt, Dorothy Siftar, a folk singer who played the Philadelphia Folk Festival with Pete Seeger and had an abundance of stringed and percussive instruments in her home. Around this time, Steve’s cousin Kenny returned from military service overseas and taught Kimock his first rock ‘n roll licks on a beautiful Gold Top Les Paul (which, incidentally and decades later, Kimock now owns). It wasn’t long until Kimock got his own guitar, a $10 acoustic that he began playing 12 hours a day, every day, and it changed his life forever.

After playing in a series of high school bands, Kimock joined the Goodman Brothers Band, which first moved to northern California in 1974. Steve’s first home was a cabin in Marin, directly behind the Ali Akbar Khan School of Music. Every morning he woke to the sound of sarods and sitars, sparking his interest in the music of other cultures that colors his own compositions to this day.

Kimock fell in with the Bay Area’s local music scene and began playing in a variety of outfits, including the salsa band The Underdogs (with flautist/saxophonist Martin Fierro). In 1979 he joined the short-­‐lived Heart of Gold Band with Grateful Dead members Keith and Donna Godchaux and drummer Greg Anton.

In 1984, Kimock and Anton co-­‐founded Zero, an instrumental psychedelic jazz/rock/blues band that also included former Underdogs bandmate Fierro, bassist Bobby Vega, keyboardist Pete Sears (who was eventually succeeded by Chip Roland), and former Quicksilver Messenger Service guitarist John Cipollina. It was during the Zero era that Kimock would define his fluid style of melodious improvisation.

By 1992, Zero was regarded as one of the marquee Bay Area bands and architects of the infant jam band genre. The band began working with Grateful Dead lyricist Robert Hunter and added vocalist Judge Murphy before going on an extended hiatus in the late ‘90s. During their initial time together, Zero released five albums including 1987’s debut Here Goes Nothin’; 1990’s Nothin’ Goes Here; 1991’s live effort Live: Go Hear Nothin’; the band’s 1994 major label debut, the live album Chance in a Million; and 1997’s self-­‐titled studio album, along with hundreds of live recordings.


While still performing with Zero, Kimock began to explore new terrain with the looser, bluesier Steve Kimock & Friends, an ever-­‐evolving project that continues to feature a cast of acclaimed singer-­‐ songwriters, Hammond B-­‐3 players, rock guitarists and numerous other serious players Kimock has befriended along the way.

Kimock spent the end of the century with KVHW, a much lauded though short-­‐lived quartet comprised of himself, Zero bassist Vega, drummer Alan Hertz, and former Frank Zappa sideman Ray White. KVHW toured nationally from January 1998 through December 1999, playing a repertoire that consisted of original compositions and songs from Kimock’s previous bands, as well as a number of Frank Zappa covers.

In February 2000, KVHW morphed into the Steve Kimock Band, which featured Kimock and Vega (who was succeeded by Alphonso Johnson in 2001), along with a rotating crew of guitarists and drummers. Eventually, the lineup solidified with drummer Rodney Holmes and guitarist Mitch Stein. In 2001, they released Live in Colorado, followed by the 2002 double live album, East Meets West (culled from shows in San Francisco and Japan); and in 2004, the double live album, Live in Colorado, Vol. II. In 2005, the Steve Kimock Band released the lauded studio album, Eudemonic and toured nationally, anchored by Kimock and Holmes with keyboardist Robert Walter (20th Congress, Greyboy Allstars) and bassist Reed Mathis (Jacob Fred Jazz Odyssey, Tea Leaf Green).

In 2009, he formed the upbeat, gospel-­‐influenced, soul-­‐rock band Steve Kimock Crazy Engine, which featured legendary Hammond B3 player Melvin Seals; Kimock’s son, John Morgan Kimock, on drums; and accomplished singer-­‐songwriter and cello player, Trevor Exter, who was plucked out of the NYC indie music scene to fill the role of bass and vocals. In 2010, Steve & John Kimock continued their collaboration for the 10th anniversary of the sold-­‐out New York Guitar Festival, where they scored a silent film (Buster Keaton’s Cops), sharing the bill with Justin Vernon (Bon Iver).

Once touted by Jerry Garcia as his “favorite unknown guitar player,” Kimock has also performed as part of Bob Weir’s Kingfish and toured in both 2007 and 2014 with RatDog, in addition to post-­‐Grateful Dead ensembles including The Other Ones, Phil Lesh & Friends, and the Rhythm Devils featuring Mickey Hart and Bill Kreutzmann. The guitarist has recorded and toured with Bruce Hornsby and worked extensively with Merl Saunders. Additionally, he has shared the stage with The Allman Brothers, Angélique Kidjo, Bonnie Raitt, Buddy Miles, Derek Trucks, Elvin Bishop, George Porter Jr., Grace Potter, Grace Slick, Joe Satriani, Jorma Kaukonen, Keller Williams, Little Feat, Nicky Hopkins, Norton Buffalo, Papa John Creach, Peter Frampton, all members of Phish, Screamin’ Jay Hawkins, Stephen Perkins, Steve Winwood, Taj Mahal, Todd Rundgren and Warren Haynes, among many others.

While Kimock’s curiosity and openness to the array of great musicians with whom he surrounds himself is nothing short of astonishing, the music he made with his brothers in Zero feels like a return to the comforts of home. In 2006, Kimock and Anton reunited Zero, touring until the death of Fierro in March 2008. In March 2011, the band reunited for the 20th anniversary of the Chance in a Million recording sessions at San Francisco’s Great American Music Hall, as a benefit for Murphy, who was battling a grave illness. After more than 30 years since forming, Zero carries on today, as the band plays select shows and benefit performances in the Bay Area.

In 2012, Kimock took the helm once again and hit the road with a new lineup, including Parliament Funkadelic/Talking Heads, Hall of Famer Bernie Worrell, drummer Wally Ingram, and bassist Andy Hess. The band played new original material while celebrating Kimock’s rich catalog of music. Kimock released a digital free live EP of the band.

After taking some time away from his own band as part of Bob Weir’s Ratdog from 2013 to 2014, Kimock followed with the return of a rollicking, revamped Steve Kimock & Friends, widely regarded as the most exciting iteration of Kimock’s rock/dance band outfit since its inception. The ensemble, featuring bassist Vega, drummers Bill Vitt, Jay Lane and John Morgan Kimock, Dead & Company keyboardist Jeff Chimenti, guitar ace Dan “Lebo” Lebowitz, and singer Leslie Mendelson, hit a joyous crescendo during the Grateful Dead’s 50th anniversary year, thrilling music lovers with great grooves and carrying on a musical legacy in a jubilant atmosphere.

Though he still devotes countless hours to refining his craft, playing his instrument has never been enough for a man coined “The Guitar Monk” by Relix magazine. The result onstage is the culmination of Kimock’s dedication to the technical intricacies of both guitars and amplifiers. Going all the way from the fundamentals of musical theory to the most scientific details of the sound-­‐production process, there are few stones Kimock has yet to turn. Driving him forward is the knowledge that there is always more to discover – that and the fact that he loves guitar too much to do anything else.
Bobby Vega
Bobby Vega
Join us for this very special Bobby Vega birthday celebration featuring:

Bobby Vega
Steve Kimock
Prairie Prince
Pete Sears
Chris Smith
Jeff Tamelier
Chris Rossbach
Miles Schon
James DePrato
Mz Dee
Greg Anton

Accomplished bassist Bobby Vega began his professional career at age 16 with Sly and the Family Stone. With well over 100 albums to his credit, he continues to explore new ground. Co-founding KVHW in the late 90’s, his musical craft continues to develop into a complex and heady blend of rhythm & blues, rock funk and improvisational jazz. He is instrumental in laying down thick grooves as well as being a driving creative force in all of his musical endeavors.

Born in San Francisco, Vega has significantly contributed to the city’s rich musical heritage. Originally acclaimed for his funky style, Vega’s reputation as a creative force has taken him into many other musical arenas. A connoisseur of the instrument, he has been called “the Jaco Pastorius of the 90’s”.

Vega performs worldwide and has recorded with such greats as Billy Preston, Paul Butterfield, Baba Olatunji, Joan Baez, Bob Weir, Kitaro and many, many others. While continuing to work on his own projects, Bobby has toured with artists including Tower of Power, Etta James, Mickey Hart, Jefferson Starship, Santana & Jerry Garcia.

An accomplished composer, he collaborated on various movie soundtracks, including the documentary film, “Vietnam, a Television History”, the Francis Ford Coppola Film, “One from the Heart”, and even composed music for the Sega video game, “Sonic, The Hedgehog III”. In 1997, Vega released a solo album titled, “Down the Road”, with special guest performances by The Turtle Island String Quartet, David Giribaldi, and Airto Moreira. Laying down a foundation with incredible feeling and groove, world class bassist Bobby Vega is as solid as a rock.
Lebo
Lebo
Lebo (Dan Lebowitz), a founding member of ALO (Brushfire/Universal Records), tours the world playing guitar, lap steel, pedal steel and singing. When not working with ALO, he can be seen performing with one of his bands (magicgravy, Trio Lebo) or working on recording projects in his San Francisco studio, Leboland.
Leslie Mendelson
Leslie Mendelson
Leslie Mendelson will release Love & Murder—the singer/songwriter’s first new album in eight years—on April 14. A stirring work instilled with emotional depth, the effort is the long-awaited follow up to her Grammy Award-nominated debut, Swan Feathers. It’s an apropos title, reflecting the dichotomy between the dark and light she encountered in those years between. Poised for stardom in 2009 with comparisons to Carole King and Rickie Lee Jones on the tip of tastemakers’ lips, fate as it often does, had other plans. Perhaps this was to the benefit of her art. After losing a record and management deal and having her friend and producer Joel Dorn unexpectedly pass away, Mendelson recommitted to herself and slowly but surely penned the songs with her longtime co-writer Steve McEwan that would become Love & Murder.

Produced by Mark Howard (Bob Dylan, Lucinda Williams), Love & Murder is a sparse, raw collection of ten folk songs. Opening with “Jericho,” a haunting number that sets the tone for what’s to come, it makes clear that the album lies more within darker spaces that artists like Sharon Van Etten, Lana Del Rey and Dusty Springfield inhabit. Songs like “Murder Me,” “Coney Island,” and “Chasing the Thrill” find Leslie exploring loss in ways that feel personal and metaphorical, where the stories within are multifaceted. She also recorded three covers: the classic-country infused “Cry, Cry Darlin’,” a take on Bob Dylan’s classic “Just Like a Woman,” played on the ukulele, and a duet with The Grateful Dead’s Bob Weir on Roy Orbison’s “Blue Bayou.” In fact, Mendelson was unwittingly adopted by the West Coast jam scene after Weir heard her take on “Friend of the Devil” and recruited her to perform with him.

On Love & Murder, however, Leslie Mendelson offers a different side of her artistry that isn’t present in her early work or recent collaborations. “This collection is just about the songs and my voice,” she says. “That's what people can connect with. It shows where I am right now as an artist and where I want to go.”
Venue Information:
Sweetwater Music Hall
19 Corte Madera Ave.
Mill Valley, CA, 94941
http://www.sweetwatermusichall.com/